A transient rise in tropical sea surface temperature during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

Online Access: Get full text
doi: 10.1126/science.1090110
Author(s): Zachos, James C.; Wara, Michael W.; Bohaty, Steven; Delaney, Margaret L.; Petrizzo, Maria Rose; Brill, Amanda; Bralower, Timothy J.; Premoli Silva, Isabella
Author Affiliation(s): Primary:
University of California at Santa Cruz, Earth and Ocean Sciences Departments, Santa Cruz, CA, United States
Other:
Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy
University of North Carolina, United States
Pennsylvania State University, United States
Volume Title: Science
Source: Science, 302(5650), p.1551-1554. Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC, United States. ISSN: 0036-8075 CODEN: SCIEAS
Note: In English. 44 refs.; illus.
Summary: The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) has been attributed to a rapid rise in greenhouse gas levels. If so, warming should have occurred at all latitudes, although amplified toward the poles. Existing records reveal an increase in high-latitude sea surface temperatures (SSTs) (8° to 10°C) and in bottom water temperatures (4° to 5°C). To date, however, the character of the tropical SST response during this event remains unconstrained. Here we address this deficiency by using paired oxygen isotope and minor element (magnesium/calcium) ratios of planktonic foraminifera from a tropical Pacific core to estimate changes in SST. Using mixed-layer foraminifera, we found that the combined proxies imply a 4° to 5°C rise in Pacific SST during the PETM. These results would necessitate a rise in atmospheric pCO2 to levels three to four times as high as those estimated for the late Paleocene.
Year of Publication: 2003
Research Program: ODP Ocean Drilling Program
Key Words: 12 Stratigraphy, Historical Geology and Paleoecology; Aliphatic hydrocarbons; Alkanes; Anomalies; Carbon dioxide; Cenozoic; Chemical ratios; Climate change; Cores; Eocene; Foraminifera; Geochemistry; Greenhouse effect; Hydrocarbons; Invertebrata; Isotope ratios; Isotopes; Leg 198; Marine sediments; Methane; Microfossils; North Pacific; Northwest Pacific; O-18/O-16; ODP Site 1209; Ocean Drilling Program; Organic compounds; Oxygen; Pacific Ocean; Paleo-oceanography; Paleocene; Paleoclimatology; Paleoenvironment; Paleogene; Paleotemperature; Planktonic taxa; Protista; Salinity; Sea-surface temperature; Sediments; Shatsky Rise; Stable isotopes; Tertiary; West Pacific
Coordinates: N323900 N324000 E1583100 E1583000
Record ID: 2004006675
Copyright Information: GeoRef, Copyright 2019 American Geosciences Institute.