Leg 189 Summary

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doi: 10.2973/odp.proc.ir.189.101.2001
Author(s): Exon, Neville F.; Kennett, James P.; Malone, Mitchell J.; Brinkhuis, Henk; Chaproniere, George C. H.; Ennyu, Atsuhito; Fothergill, Patrick; Fuller, Michael D.; Grauert, Marianne; Hill, Peter J.; Janecek, Thomas R.; Kelly, Daniel C.; Latimer, Jennifer C.; Nees, Stefan; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Nürnberg, Dirk; Pekar, Stephen F.; Pellaton, Caroline C.; Pfuhl, Helen A.; Robert, Christian M.; Roessig, Kristeen L. McGonigal; Röhl, Ursula; Schellenberg, Stephen A.; Shevenell, Amelia E.; Stickley, Catherine E.; Suzuki, Noritoshi; Touchard, Yannick; Wei, Wuchang; White, Timothy S.
Ocean Drilling Program, Leg 189, Shipboard Scientific Party, College Station, TX
Author Affiliation(s): Primary:
Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Petroleum and Marine Division, Canberra, Australia
Other:
University of California at Santa Barbara, United States
Texas A&M University, United States
Utrecht University, Netherlands
Australian National University, Australia
Pennsylvania State University, United States
University of Leicester, United Kingdom
University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States
University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Florida State University, United States
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, United States
Indiana University/Purdue University, United States
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Federal Republic of Germany
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, United States
Rutgers State University of New Jersey, United States
Université de Genève, Switzerland
University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Centre d'Oceanologie de Marseille, France
Universität Bremen, Federal Republic of Germany
University of California at Santa Cruz, United States
University College London, United Kingdom
Tohoku University, Japan
CEREGE, France
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, United States
Volume Title: Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, initial reports, the Tasmanian Gateway, Cenozoic climatic and oceanographic development; covering Leg 189 of the cruises of the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution; Hobart, Tasmania, to Sydney, Australia; sites 1168-1172, 11 March-6 May 2000
Volume Author(s): Exon, Neville F.; Kennett, James P.; Malone, Mitchell J.; Brinkhuis, Henk; Chaproniere, George C. H.; Ennyu, Atsuhito; Fothergill, Patrick; Fuller, Michael D.; Grauert, Marianne; Hill, Peter J.; Janecek, Thomas R.; Kelly, Daniel C.; Latimer, Jennifer C.; Nees, Stefan; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Nürnberg, Dirk; Pekar, Stephen F.; Pellaton, Caroline C.; Pfuhl, Helen A.; Robert, Christian M.; Roessig, Kristeen L. McGonigal; Röhl, Ursula; Schellenberg, Stephen A.; Shevenell, Amelia E.; Stickley, Catherine E.; Suzuki, Noritoshi; Touchard, Yannick; Wei, Wuchang; White, Timothy S.; Scroggs, John M.
Source: Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, initial reports, the Tasmanian Gateway, Cenozoic climatic and oceanographic development; covering Leg 189 of the cruises of the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution; Hobart, Tasmania, to Sydney, Australia; sites 1168-1172, 11 March-6 May 2000, Neville F. Exon, James P. Kennett, Mitchell J. Malone, Henk Brinkhuis, George C. H. Chaproniere, Atsuhito Ennyu, Patrick Fothergill, Michael D. Fuller, Marianne Grauert, Peter J. Hill, Thomas R. Janecek, Daniel C. Kelly, Jennifer C. Latimer, Stefan Nees, Ulysses S. Ninnemann, Dirk Nürnberg, Stephen F. Pekar, Caroline C. Pellaton, Helen A. Pfuhl, Christian M. Robert, Kristeen L. McGonigal Roessig, Ursula Röhl, Stephen A. Schellenberg, Amelia E. Shevenell, Catherine E. Stickley, Noritoshi Suzuki, Yannick Touchard, Wuchang Wei, Timothy S. White and John M. Scroggs; Ocean Drilling Program, Leg 189, Shipboard Scientific Party, College Station, TX. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Part A: Initial Reports, Vol.189, 98p. Publisher: Texas A & M University, Ocean Drilling Program, College Station, TX, United States. ISSN: 0884-5883
Note: In English. Also available on CD-ROM in PDF format and on the Web in PDF or HTML. 92 refs.CD-ROM format, ISSN 1096-2522; WWW format, ISSN 1096-2158; illus., incl. sects., 4 tables, sketch maps
Summary: The Cenozoic Era is unusual in its development of major ice sheets. Progressive high-latitude cooling during the Cenozoic eventually formed major ice sheets. initially on Antarctica and later in the Northern hemisphere. In the early 1970, a hypothesis was proposed that climatic cooling and an Antarctic cryosphere developed as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current progressively thermally isolated the Antarctic continent. This current resulted from the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway south of Tasmania during the Paleogene and the Drake Passage during the earliest Neogene. The five Leg 189 drill sites, in 2463 to 3568 m water depths, tested, refined, and extended the above hypothesis, greatly improving understanding of Southern Ocean evolution and its relation with Antarctic climatic development. The relatively shallow region off Tasmania is one of the few places where well-preserved and almost-complete marine Cenozoic carbonate-rich sequences can be drilled in present-day latitudes of 40°-50°S and paleolatitudes of up to 70°S. The broad geological history of all the sites was comparable, although there are important differences among the three sites in the Indian Ocean and the two sites in the Pacific Ocean, as well as from north to south.
Year of Publication: 2001
Research Program: ODP Ocean Drilling Program
Key Words: 12 Stratigraphy, Historical Geology and Paleoecology; Antarctic Ocean; Antarctica; Australasia; Australia; Biostratigraphy; Cenozoic; Climate change; Cores; Cretaceous; Cycles; Leg 189; Lithostratigraphy; Mesozoic; Neogene; Ocean Drilling Program; Ocean circulation; Ocean floors; Pacific Ocean; Paleo-oceanography; Paleoclimatology; Paleoenvironment; Paleogene; Paleogeography; Paleomagnetism; Plate tectonics; Quaternary; Reconstruction; South Pacific; Southwest Pacific; Tasman Sea; Tasmania Australia; Tertiary; Upper Cretaceous; West Pacific
Coordinates: S483000 S423000 E1500000 E1440000
Record ID: 2001075838
Copyright Information: GeoRef, Copyright 2019 American Geosciences Institute.