Philippe Bertrand

Philippe Bertrand (1663–1724) was a French sculptor of the late 17th and early 18th century. He received commissions for sculptures for both the Château de Marly and Versailles. In November, 1701, he was made a full member of the Académie de peinture et de sculpture upon the display of a royal commission of 1700, his small bronze of the ''Rape of Helen'', a svelte composition of three figures with a debt to Giambologna's ''Rape of a Sabine Woman''. He was known for sculpting flowing, graceful, and even flying figures, particularly in his bronzes.

In 1714, when the choir of Notre-Dame was refurbished in academic Baroque manner, in Louis XIV's fulfillment of a vow made by Louis XIII, Bertrand was commissioned to provide a small allegorical bronze as the prize for a poetry competition on the occasion, organised by the Académie française to celebrate the completion of the project; it is conserved in the Wallace Collection, London.

Two further small collectors' bronzes by Bertrand are in the Royal Collection, ''Psyche and Mercury'' and ''Prometheus Bound''; they are characteristic purchases of George IV. Provided by Wikipedia
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Published in 1990
doi: 10.1029/GL017i011p02073
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Published in 1991
doi: 10.2973/odp.proc.sr.124.170.1991
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